Commentary

It wasn’t another episode of “we’re losing all the old stuff that made this place different and special” that prompted public consternation when Renton-based, family-owned retailer McLendon Hardware agreed to be acquired. 

If this journalism thing doesn’t work out, I have a backup plan: helping the pharmaceutical industry come up with names for their new drugs.

On a recent visit to Berkeley, where I attended the University of California in the late 1970s, I was struck by how little the city had changed. The neighborhoods are still lined with century-old houses. 

The United States pays more for and gets less from its health care system than peer nations.

Although we are still in the early months of a new presidential administration, we have seen an upending of the status quo and an undoing of America’s role as a leader in a more integrated, global economy.

During World War II, when accommodations were scarce, the house where I’ve lived for the past 28 years was a flophouse for more than a dozen railroad workers. Beds were lined up six to a room.

If there exists a common thread in the crazy-quilt method of the Kushner/Trump administration, it surely must be the enthusiastic repudiation of “government overreach.”

There’s a growing bipartisan consensus that a carbon tax just makes sense. A group of national Republican leaders with the Climate Leadership Council recently released a climate plan advocating for a carbon tax.

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Albers School of Business and Economics' Dr. Marilyn Gist shares advice for business leaders, including how technology impacts leadership, the quality most business leaders share, and the downside of being driven