Issue

July 2016

From this Issue

Seattle Business magazine's 100 Best Companies work hard, but they also know how to have fun! Check out the lip sync video we made with a few of our favorite honorees. We can't stop the feeling that they are awesome!

The results are based on confidential employee surveys as well as a company’s level of employee participation. For example, if a company scores well in the 10 categories described below but has low employee participation, it doesn’t do as well in the rankings as a company with similar scores and a much better participation rate.

“Really happy employees make really happy clients.” That’s been the working principle since Jeff Pelletier founded Board & Vellum in 2011.

Kinetic Sports Rehab blends chiropractic, physical therapy and sports medicine to give its clients “something different” in the pursuit of recovery from injury, relief from pain and improvement in athletic performance.

RealSelf, which turns 10 this fall, is an online community sharing information about elective cosmetic procedures — from breast augmentation to Brazilian butt lifts, from “mommy makeovers” to microdermabrasion, from porcelain veneers to permanent makeup.

Prime 8 provides consulting services to local giants like Amazon, Microsoft, Premera and Boeing.

When Geeman Yip started BitTitan in 2007, he envisioned a workplace reminiscent of the dot.com days with fun, collaborative spaces.

PitchBook offers clients data on global mergers and acquisitions, private equity and venture capital activity that goes far beyond what’s available online.

Washington is home to 10 branches and just over 130 employees of Navy Federal Credit Union, an organization with more than $75 billion in assets, 6 million members, 281 branches and more than 13,000 employees.

Seattle represents a major tech hub for Hulu, the online streaming TV service with ad-supported free video content and subscription-based premium viewing.

The under representation of women on boards of directors and in the C-suite is astounding in a world driven by analytics aimed at increasing the bottom line. Of the nearly 22,000 companies examined in a 2014 study conducted by the Peterson Institute for International Economics, approximately 60 percent had no female board members, more than half had no women holding executive-level positions and fewer than 5 percent had a female CEO.

If you want to know where the economy is growing fastest, follow the data.

Amazon has poured tens of billions of dollars into building close to 100 highly automated ware-houses around the country to cut costs and reduce delivery times. That reality has put competitors in a quandary. How can they match Amazon’s capabilities without spending the same kind of money to build a similar network?

At Skagit Valley Malting, Wayne Carpenter presides over a rapidly increasing assortment of squat metal silos that store the grain he buys from local farmers. Carpenter started Skagit Valley Malting to take advantage of the grain supply and to specialize in low-protein malt for craft brewers, producing custom malt on demand.

This summer, more than any in recent memory, promises to be a season for the outdoors. And that is where we’ll focus our summer wines on: bottles appropriate for campground picnic tables, all-day barbecues or plain old patio pounding.

LabConnect’s steady expansion stems from a canny assessment of an opportunity to improve how pharmaceutical companies and medical device manufacturers conduct their clinical trials. The company recognized a need for better management of the clinical trial process, from identifying research laboratories that excel in certain areas to handling specimens and managing data.

The bankruptcy of Detroit — which was $18 billion in debt and had to cut pension benefits for many municipal workers — shows how critical it is for cities to have meaningful pension reform. Seattle recently took important first steps to change its pensions, but more fundamental reforms are needed.

On the fifth floor of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Dr. Jim Olson and his team are training a robot to process and purify hardy peptides known as knottins, some of which are natural compounds made by plants and animals as diverse as sunflowers and scorpions.

People like to rave about companies that have pool tables in their lounges, free massages at employees’ desks and Friday afternoon happy hours at favorite watering holes. But seldom will such perks make us passionate about the companies we work for.

Brian Unmacht spent six years working at his father’s drugstore company and, after college, 27 years at REI, before becoming only the fourth CEO in Bartell Drugs’ 126-year history. Now he’s intent on using local partnerships to make Bartell a strong competitor to the national drugstore chains.

"Death by Design" sounds like a Woody Allen film. It’s not.

It’s a documentary by Sue Williams, who has been making films in and about China for 30 years. And it’s kind of scary.