Tim Jenkins and Darran Littlefield


Point BTim Jenkins and Darran Littlefield have always been at odds
with convention. Both came from the same traditional accounting firm where long
hours and heavy travel demands made them question the very basis on which the
industry was structured. They each had families and lives outside work. Was
there a way to make themselves happy while also keeping their customers satisfied?
There was only one way to find out: They established their own firm, Point B
, and both adopted the role of co-CEO.

When they set out on their own in 1995, they took
significant risks. Littlefield was married with children, and Jenkins and his
wife were expecting their first child. Jenkins’ mother thought the move was so
foolhardy, she removed him from being executor of her will. But Jenkins and
Littlefield stuck to their core values of putting people first. They
implemented an employee stock ownership plan with the goal of keeping the
company 100 percent employee-owned. To maintain low costs, the company decided
to have no fixed office space. The headquarters are conference rooms on the
22nd floor of a high-rise in downtown Seattle, but most of Point B’s
consultants are either working from home or at a client’s location. Point B
also hired a culture director and developed their own concept of project
leadership with a focus on being flexible and getting things done. Since 2000,
Point B has opened satellite offices in six cities to expand its reach beyond
the Seattle market. Growth into new markets on the East Coast is expected
within the next few years. 


Rajeev Agarwal

Founder and managing consultant, MAQ Software (Redmond)

Agrawal, RajeevRajeev Agarwal knows the value of an education. He was among
the 1.5 percent of 100,000 applicants accepted into the Indian Institute of
Technology in India, a country in which roughly a third of the population is

Armed with a master’s in engineering from Iowa State
University and an MBA from the University of Michigan, Agarwal came away with
one key business philosophy: Have very few rules and apply them consistently.

For the past 10 years, that is how he has led MAQ Software, a digital
marketing and technology company, which is also a preferred vendor of
Microsoft. The company, with its single focus and great execution, works
closely with Microsoft (where Agarwal once worked) in addition to using
open-source technology to manage a global business efficiently and
cost-effectively. The company has 100 employees locally and 200 more in India.

Greg Rankich

CEO, Xtreme Consulting Group (Redmond)

Greg RankichGreg Rankich isn’t as concerned about whether customers are
coming in so much as he is about if they are coming back. If they came back, he
knew his company, Xtreme Consulting Group, was doing not just well but great.
That exponential growth in return business manifested in August 2009 as Xtreme
was named the 41st fastest growing company in the country by Inc. Magazine.

A former Microsoft employee, Rankich had been exposed to a
lot of corporate decision making and saw the amount of money spent on business
and technical services. He knew he could provide quality and cost-effective
services for groups and clients both within Microsoft and without. Rankich
founded Xtreme in August 2005 and almost immediately had former co-workers and
new clients knocking.

“This aha moment made me confident that my idea and desire
to grow a business services firm was about to be realized,” Rankich says.

Next: Finanical Services

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2016 Tech Impact Awards: Tech Impact Champion

2016 Tech Impact Awards: Tech Impact Champion

Congratulations, Ed Lazowska!

Ed Lazowska, Ph.D.
Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington

When Ed Lazowska arrived in Seattle 39 years ago as an assistant professor, both the University of Washington and the region were very different places. In computer science, he was the newest of only 13 faculty members. The region’s tech industry largely consisted of Boeing, Fluke and Physio-Control. Microsoft at the time was still a dozen people in Albuquerque. 
Today, the UW’s Computer Science & Engineering Department rivals Stanford’s and Carnegie Mellon’s for attracting tech talent and major research — accomplishments that Lazowska helped bring about. As the university’s department chair, his effort to recruit leading data scientists included personally reaching out to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who provided $2 million from Amazon to endow two professorships and personally met with researchers. A decade after leading fundraising to build the Paul G. Allen Center for Computer Science & Engineering, he is doing so again to build a new CSE facility that will help double the center’s capacity.
“Our job,” Lazowksa asserts, “is to provide socioeconomic mobility for bright kids in this region.”
Driving opportunities through research remains his passion, as his own studies in high-performance computing, multicomputer processing and big data science have proved. An early technical adviser on the formation of Microsoft Research and a member of two national advisory committees on science and technology policy, he has promoted private and public investment in “engineering things that one day in the future will be used in game-changing products.”
Lazowska believes big data and cloud computing “lie at the heart of 21st century discovery.” He helped found and now leads the UW’s eScience Institute, a cross-campus partnership that helps scholars in fields such as astronomy, biology and sociology take advantage of data analytics to enhance their research. Given the region’s far-reaching cloud expertise, Lazowska says, “This is an area that Seattle has the potential to own.”
Lazowska’s other initiatives include promoting K-12 STEM education and gender diversity in the UW program. He champions the notion that all students should study computer science to cultivate the “computational thinking” skills needed for the new century.
Lazowska marvels at the region’s transformation into a place “with distinctive and innovative activities in the broadest range of areas.” With his trademark enthusiasm for the UW and the local tech sector, this celebrated educator, researcher, adviser and booster has played an important role in that transformation.
Previous Tech Impact Champions
Tech Impact Champions are chosen not only for their achievements in technology but also for championing the region’s broader tech sector. Past inductees in Seattle Business magazine’s Hall of Technology Champions, previously called Lifetime Achievement Award honorees, are:
  2012: John McAdams, former CEO, F5 Networks
  2013: Jeremy Jaech, cofounder, Aldus and Visio, and chair emeritus, the Technology Alliance
  2014: Steve Ballmer, former CEO, Microsoft
  2015: Tom Alberg, cofounder, Madrona Venture Group