Tech Impact Awards 2013: Productivity

| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

WINNER: Smartsheet.com

Location: Bellevue | Employees: smartsheet.com

Spreadsheets have always been about numbers, first as a way of totaling accounts and later as a means of managing innumerable tasks. This growing Bellevue company takes the humble spreadsheet to the cloud so that fast-changing information can be easily shared through this very familiar form.

Using Smartsheet.com, customers can build and maintain any kind of information they like, but with features that are especially helpful for creating and managing lists of information. With Smartsheet documents living in the cloud, they can be more effectively used collaboratively, even with multiple people using them at the same time through the web or mobile apps.

As an example, the event planners of this year’s NCAA Final Four college basketball championship used Smartsheet to coordinate tasks like transporation, equipment and security among dozens of teams.

The company’s own numbers are impressive: triple-digit growth since the product’s redesign in 2010. Today, more than 2.5 million people use Smartsheet among some 22,000 subscribing organizations in more than 100 countries.

 

SILVER: DocuSign

Location: Seattle | Employees: 350 | docusign.com

Deals thrive or die on a signature, and this pioneering firm has helped put secure electronic signatures on more than 290 million documents to close deals fast. Ten-year-old DocuSign has made a highly successful transition to the cloud, with the DocuSign Global Network integrating well with other cloud-based file services such as Box, Dropbox, Google Docs and Salesforce. With mobile apps for phones and tablets, DocuSign helps companies reduce their volume of paper documents while making them more visible and secure.

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