Neal Keny-Guyer

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Neal Keny-GuyerMercy Corps moves past politics and crosses geographical
boundaries to provide humanitarian aid and bring sustainable development to
countries stricken by war, poverty or natural disasters.

With more than 3,700 employees, Mercy Corps now reaches
nearly 16.7 million people in more than 40 countries, providing them with
microfinance services, disaster response, trauma relief and agricultural
development.

CEO Neal Keny-Guyer credits his mother with inspiring his
passion. She instilled in him the belief that everyone has a responsibility to
make the world a better place. From a young age, he (often with her alongside
him) has been involved in service projects.

In his 16 years as CEO of Mercy Corps, Keny-Guyer has helped
make it one of the most effective humanitarian and development organizations in
the world. After the massive earthquake in Haiti last January, Mercy Corps was
one of the first organizations to set up relief and recovery operations in
Port-au-Prince—a city that had all but been cut off from the rest of the world.

Mercy Corps also developed Indonesia’s Bank Andara, a
so-called “bank of banks” in 2008. It has become the first commercial bank in
Indonesia created exclusively to serve the country’s large but fragmented
microfinance sector.

Keny-Guyer’s leadership has helped Mercy Corps see
philanthropy and aid as investments in innovative and sustainable development
worldwide.

Next: Consulting

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