These Two Washington Universities Are Neck-And-Neck in a Measure of Graduates’ Workforce Salaries

SmartAsset study assessed average starting salaries of students graduating with bachelor’s degrees
Updated: Fri, 09/20/2019 - 09:41
 
 
  • SmartAsset study assessed average starting salaries of students graduating with bachelor’s degrees

The University of Washington Seattle campus edged out Seattle University as Washington college whose graduates earn the highest average starting salary, according to a study by personal-finance platform SmartAsset.

Graduates of the UW Seattle campus command a $59,900 average starting salary, compared with Seattle University graduates’ average starting salary of $59,400, the study shows. Next in line is the UW Bothell campus, with a starting salary of $58,200, followed by Gonzaga University in Spokane, $56,300; UW Tacoma, $55,600; and Washington State University in Pullman, $54,600.

In terms of the college deemed the best value, based on weighting of college tuition and living costs, average starting salary, and grants and scholarships, the UW Seattle campus again claims the top spot, according to the SmartAsset study. Ranking second through fifth on that measure, respectively, are the following: UW Bothell, UW Tacoma, Washington State University and Western Washington University in Bellingham. 

As with most statistic, however, how you cut the data can make all the difference. A study by Seattle-based PayScale released this past August that assessed mid-career pay of Washington university graduates put Seattle University at the top of the pack, with a $113,700 salary mark.

The UW Seattle campus ranked second, in the PayScale study, with its graduate commanding an average mid-career salary of $112,300 ― followed by UW Bothell, Gonzaga University and Washington State University in the third through fifth spots, respectively.

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