Comcast Brings The Classroom to Your Home

Media giant offers free educational programming for kids K-12
Updated: Thu, 04/09/2020 - 09:09
 
 
  • Cable giant offers free educational programming for kids K-12

Turning on the TV has never been more educational.

Media giant Comcast Corp. has curated nearly 2,000 hours of free educational programming for K-12 students as the coronavirus forces public officials to shut schools down across the country. Xfinity customers can access content according to grade levels.

The collection, done in partnership with Common Sense Media, includes history, media, language arts, social studies and math programming as well as educational series from networks and streaming services, including Animal Planet, PBS Kids and the Smithsonian Channel.

“We know how challenging it is for families right now who are suddenly homeschooling young children – many with both parents working, as well,” says Rebecca Heap, Comcast’s senior vice president of video & entertainment.

Gov. Jay Inslee recently ordered that public schools across Washington state shut down the remainder of the school year, though online learning is still taking place. As of April 7, the state reported 9,097 confirmed cases of coronavirus, with 421 deaths. More than 88,000 residents have taken tests; 8.7% have tested positive, according to the state Department of Health.

 

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