John Levesque

As every first-year business student knows, a city’s economy is not considered “world class” until said city has erected at least four shrines to professional sports and these shrines remain empty and unused most days of the year.

If you travel along Pike Street between Seventh and Ninth avenues in downtown Seattle, you’ve seen them. The boulders.

Am I the only one troubled by the ground-floor vacancies in all of the new buildings going up in Seattle?

Elsewhere in this month's issue you’ll find congratulatory notes honoring The Boeing Company on the occasion of its 100th anniversary. Allow me to add my own felicitations.

On a recent visit to New York City, I said, “You’ll never catch me riding a bike around Manhattan.” Heck, you’ll never catch me riding a bike around Seattle.

Friends and I were talking recently about one of Seattle’s infrastructure problems — don’t remember if it was the abysmal traffic, rising homelessness, the messy waterfront — and I said, as I often do in these situations, “Maybe it’s time for Buddy Cianci.” All told, Vincent A. “Buddy” Cianci, who died in January, was mayor of Providence, Rhode Island, for 21 years. He also was a convicted felon.

What constitutes a great company to work for? Don't ask the Mariners.