Final Analysis

Imagine getting a call inviting you to work for your country. Now imagine your new boss is Donald J. Trump. Would you move to Washington, D.C., to work for the president of the United States? For this president of the United States?

Despite its origins in the rugged north country, Alaska Airlines is a button-down shirt and wingtips. As recently as five years ago, it distributed Bible verses with its in-flight meals. Virgin America, meanwhile, with a provenance linked to the flamboyant entrepreneur Richard Branson, is more T-shirt and flip-flops.

As every first-year business student knows, a city’s economy is not considered “world class” until said city has erected at least four shrines to professional sports and these shrines remain empty and unused most days of the year.

If you travel along Pike Street between Seventh and Ninth avenues in downtown Seattle, you’ve seen them. The boulders.

Elsewhere in this month's issue you’ll find congratulatory notes honoring The Boeing Company on the occasion of its 100th anniversary. Allow me to add my own felicitations.

On a recent visit to New York City, I said, “You’ll never catch me riding a bike around Manhattan.” Heck, you’ll never catch me riding a bike around Seattle.

Friends and I were talking recently about one of Seattle’s infrastructure problems — don’t remember if it was the abysmal traffic, rising homelessness, the messy waterfront — and I said, as I often do in these situations, “Maybe it’s time for Buddy Cianci.” All told, Vincent A. “Buddy” Cianci, who died in January, was mayor of Providence, Rhode Island, for 21 years. He also was a convicted felon.

Tying in to 'Star Wars' is the clever approach.