Issue

December 2016

From this Issue

The idea of fashion as artistic expression isn’t exactly new. But museums have latched on to it in a big way, ever since the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York surprised itself in 2011 with a record-shattering show on the work of the late fashion designer Alexander McQueen.

Rik Allen, a Rhode Island native, moved to Washington in 1995 to work at Pilchuck Glass School and become a member of the William Morris sculpture team.

New legislation requiring Seattle businesses with 500 or more employees to schedule workers’ hourly shifts two weeks in advance will be a boon to some, but it could complicate the lives of many workers and employers.

 
The term “see-through building” described not an architectural design style but the leasing status of downtown Seattle office buildings in the early 1990s, the result of a surge of speculative construction spurred by all the demand for space that was expected to arrive — and didn’t. 
 

Close your eyes and think of crackers. What do you see? Puffy Oyster Crackers? Square Saltines? Round Ritz? Triscuits? Wheat Thins? Goldfish? Paul Pigott would prefer that you see flat, crispy Croccantini — thinner than RyKrisp, sturdier than matzo, hefty enough to swipe through a tub of cream cheese and flavorful enough to complement the Cambozola that’s on special in the cheese cooler at the end of his outstretched arm.

When Bill Gates visited the Seattle World’s Fair as a 6-year-old in 1962, he claims to have visited every pavilion. At the General Electric Living pavilion, he would have seen a vision of a digitized residence, with home computers, electronic libraries and television programming projected on the interior walls.

If you travel along Pike Street between Seventh and Ninth avenues in downtown Seattle, you’ve seen them. The boulders.

Heritage/Legacy award // Ensuring multiple generations of family leadership

Innovation // Strategically employing new methods to achieve positive change

When you get right down to it, a family business will always be a mom-and-pop operation.

Larry W. “Chip” Hunter, a scholar of human resource management and industrial relations, became dean of Washington State University’s Carson College of Business in March 2015. He aims to make Carson College the premier place in the Northwest for an undergraduate business education.

One in a monthly series of miniprofiles featuring local executives “off the clock.”