Commentary

Despite its origins in the rugged north country, Alaska Airlines is a button-down shirt and wingtips. As recently as five years ago, it distributed Bible verses with its in-flight meals. Virgin America, meanwhile, with a provenance linked to the flamboyant entrepreneur Richard Branson, is more T-shirt and flip-flops.

The end of January marks the Chinese New Year as well as the elevation of a volatile, capricious new leader to the highest office on the planet. Had we been more attuned to the finer points of Chinese astrology, we would have predicted the election-year peculiarities that produced this result.

For decades, scientists have been warning us about The Big One — the looming magnitude 9.0 earthquake that is expected to cause devastating damage to a substantial portion of the Pacific Northwest coast. While it’s uncertain exactly when this megaquake will hit, Seattle has recently taken major steps toward getting in front of the threat.

As every first-year business student knows, a city’s economy is not considered “world class” until said city has erected at least four shrines to professional sports and these shrines remain empty and unused most days of the year.

It’s easy to be pessimistic about the outlook for 2017. After 90 months of growth, the economic expansion is aging and may not have much life left.

Investors do not lack opportunities to deploy their capital, but being able to generate respectable returns is much more difficult.

If you travel along Pike Street between Seventh and Ninth avenues in downtown Seattle, you’ve seen them. The boulders.

Seattle has recently taken major steps towards getting in front of the threat of a major earthquake.

Eighteen years isn’t much of a business lifespan, especially in a region that has companies from the Klondike gold rush still operating. But the dot-com boom and bust might as well date from the Paleozoic Era for all the notice and influence those events command today.