Off the Clock Profile #1: Joe Fugere

Founder and CEO, Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria.
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first in a monthly series of miniprofiles featuring local executives "off the clock."

EXECUTIVE'S NAME, TITLE AND COMPANY NAME.
Joe Fugere, founder & CEO, Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria

TELL US WHAT YOUR COMPANY DOES AND WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO THIS BUSINESS.
Tutta Bella takes great pride in enriching neighborhoods and nourishing lives by sharing traditions, authentic food and love through Tutta Bella’s family of five Neapolitan pizzerias in Seattle, Bellevue and Issaquah. We serve certified authentic pizzas, pasta, salads, handcrafted cocktails, beer, wine and housemade desserts. The newest member of the family is D’Asporto, a beautiful food truck built from a converted shipping container and outfitted with an Italian oven. Since January 2016, we have been operating the Hollywood Tavern, a historic tavern and restaurant built in 1947 in the heart of Woodinville’s wine country. At the tavern, we bring community together with inventive craft cocktails, expressive tavern fare and a fun, informal atmosphere.

I’ve always had a love for creative, authentic cooking. My professional training is in hospitality business management (WSU), and my grandmother was an Italian immigrant who arrived in Seattle in 1911 with my great-grandparents from the Calabria region just south of Naples. I was also interested in creating a purpose-driven company that is committed to continuously improving our business, while also making a positive social and environmental impact.

WHAT BOOK/TV SHOW/PODCAST ARE YOU READING/WATCHING/LISTENING TO AND WHY?
I just finished Howard Behar’s new book, The Magic Cup: A Business Parable about a Leader, a Team, and the Power of Putting People and Values First. Howard has been a mentor ever since I worked for him in the international division at Starbucks in the ’90s. This “business fable” follows a newly named CEO through the process of earning respect from his employees by applying authentic leadership lessons to achieve outstanding results. I also recently discovered the TV show, Mr. Selfridge. The series is about an American entrepreneur and retail tycoon who aspired to open the world’s finest department store in London in the early 20th century. It's an inspiring lesson in taking risks, staying focused and applying innovation to an established industry.

WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE SPOT IN SEATTLE?
I know this sounds crazy, but I like to hang out at Ruby Chow Park at the north end of Boeing Field. When I was a child, my best friend’s father would take us there to watch jets take off and land. Even today, I can identify almost any airliner in the sky just by looking at its belly and engine configuration. There is also an amazing view of Mount Rainier from the park.

 

WHAT KIND OF CAR DO YOU DRIVE AND WHY?
I drive a 2012, Firenze red Range Rover Evoque. We affectionately call it “Red Rover” at Tutta Bella and it has traveled many miles between our five locations. I was attracted to the car because of its innovative styling. I also loved that it was one of the few “concept cars” that went into production with relatively few changes.

TELL US SOMETHING PEOPLE DON'T KNOW ABOUT YOU.
When I was 16 years old, one of my first jobs was dressing up as a loaf of bread and traveling to QFCs around Seattle. I was called “Freddy Fresh Guy” and customers were encouraged to squeeze me to see just how fresh I was. Can you imagine what a field day HR departments would have with that job description today?

WHAT ARE YOU PASSIONATE ABOUT OUTSIDE OF WORK?
Gardening. I am a foliage fanatic — I love plants with intriguing leaf patterns.

I also prioritize planning travel adventures and spending time with my three grandkids.

› Tell us about your Off the Clock activities. Visit seattlebusinessmag.com/clock-seattle-executive.

Coffee with Guppy: Seeking Authenticity with Tom Kundig

Coffee with Guppy: Seeking Authenticity with Tom Kundig

A chat with the celebrated Seattle architect.
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
 
Tom Kundig is a principal and owner at Olson Kundig, the Seattle architecture firm and design practice founded on the idea that “buildings can serve as a bridge between nature, culture and people.”
 
Nancy: What does an architect do? 
Tom: An architect solves problems. We observe what’s going on culturally, both historically and currently, and try to make buildings that resolve a situation, whatever it might be. 
 
Did you always want to be an architect? 
Oh, no. My dad’s an architect, I grew up with architects around me and there was a certain culture about architecture that I didn’t particularly appreciate, but what I did appreciate were the artists in that environment. Eventually, against all sanity, I wound up in architecture and couldn’t be happier. 
 
How important is the budget when you take on a project? 
It’s critical because a budget gives context and, from my perspective, the tighter the budget (within reason), the better the building because it makes you edit. When the budget is loose, the building can become overindulged. 
 
Are you a different designer now than you were when you started out? 
Oh, yes. I understand a lot more about the human condition and I understand the technical drivers much more completely. Architecture is a profession of wisdom, and it’s rare when you see that wisdom in a young architect.
 
Do you have a favorite building in Seattle? 
It’s a toss-up between the Pike & Virginia Building, designed by Olson Walker in the late ’70s/early ’80s, and St. Ignatius Chapel on the Seattle University campus. 
 
Is there a building you wish you had designed? 
Nope. There are so many conspiring forces to make mediocre buildings that when a good building happens, no matter who did it, we should just stand back and applaud! 
 
 
Tom Kundig says his main driver is "to make as much as I can out of life."
 
Are there signature elements of a Tom Kundig design? 
My desire is for an authenticity, both in cultural function and in the way that the natural materials — whether brick, steel or wood — age and get better with time. 
 
In every project you’ve done, is there always at least one thing that you hate? 
Uh, yeah, on virtually every project, but I never admit it! (Laughs) 
 
What gets you excited about a project? 
A client who’s curious about the world because that person is going to engage and ask questions in a way that may take me out of the way I typically answer.
 
What has to be there in order for you to take on a client?  
Trust. If you hire me, then I’ve got to trust you as a client and you’ve got to trust me as your architect, that I’m going to be doing my best work working for you.
 
Have you ever had to walk away from a project? 
Yeah. It’s difficult but it’s not about me. It’s about the situation. I’m not the right architect for you, you’re not the right client for me and we are wasting our time.
 
When do you know if something you’ve made is good? 
When I’m drawing and things are happening and fitting together, it’s like listening to music inside my head. It flows.
 
Is there a Tom Kundig Life Statement? 
I put a quote in my first book: “Only common things happen when common sense prevails.” I don’t know who came up with it, but it always makes me smile and it’s kind of true. If you’re looking for adventure, or something new or something worth living for, you’re looking for the edge, whatever that might be. 
 
How do you balance your creative mind with your business mind? 
I think a creative mind is a business mind because business is creative. You’re dealing with a set of issues and you’re trying to find a pathway, trying to resolve the issues, into a success. 
 
What piece of advice would you give to your younger self, when you were just starting out?  
Be more secure about your abilities and less insecure about your existence so that you can do things with a well-placed confidence. 
 
What song would you like played at your funeral? 
(Laughs) I don’t know! I won’t be hearing it so I don’t really care. 
 
You’re stuck on a desert island and can have one book, one record, one food and one person
My wife, Jeannie. Beethoven’s Ninth. A hamburger. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
 
Who or what is your worst enemy? 
Noncritical thinking. People who don’t think about what they’re saying. 
 
Beatles or Rolling Stones?  
Beatles. I share a birthday with John Lennon and sympathy with his larger musical and political agendas.
 
What four guests would make for the perfect dinner party?
Kurt Vonnegut, Richard Feynman, Indira Gandhi, Muhammad Ali. 
 
Do you have a spiritual practice and if yes, how does that practice manifest? 
I was raised a Unitarian, so it is a very personal spiritual practice and certainly influenced by both Buddhist teachings and Jesuit friends. 
 
› For more on artists, entertainers and entrepreneurs, tune in Art Aone with Nancy Guppy on the Seattle Channel (seattlechannel.org/artzone).