Bright Idea

Need a quick oil change? Maybe a complete tune-up? A year-old startup called Wrench dispatches a certified mechanic to your home or workplace and eliminates the hassle and cost of having to drop off your car at the car dealer or repair shop.

New legislation requiring Seattle businesses with 500 or more employees to schedule workers’ hourly shifts two weeks in advance will be a boon to some, but it could complicate the lives of many workers and employers.

A company creates its training program and uploads it onto Skilljar. Customers can access training on computers, tablets and smartphones, anytime and anywhere.

About three years ago, Derek Richardson and his wife bought a second home — “a dark cabin,” says Richardson. He began searching for an affordable smart lighting system but couldn’t find anything he liked. “It was $30,000 or $40,000 for a professionally installed home system,” he explains, “or it was do-it-yourself systems that were difficult to set up.”

Sometimes, bright ideas seem to fall from the sky, like Newton’s apple. More often, as in the case of HyGen, they are the product of careful analysis.

Amazon has poured tens of billions of dollars into building close to 100 highly automated ware-houses around the country to cut costs and reduce delivery times. That reality has put competitors in a quandary. How can they match Amazon’s capabilities without spending the same kind of money to build a similar network?

If the body is driven more by information than by chemistry, why not treat disease with information? This question led Matthew Scholz to biology, and, ultimately, to Immusoft Corporation, a Seattle company he founded in 2009.

Seattle startup provides one-stop shopping for algorithms.

Envelop VR is pushing into new tech worlds.

Ultrasound device from Seattle firm could vastly enhance diagnosis of ear infections.