WASHINGTON'S LEADING BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Washingtonians Remain Anxious About Job Security

Evergreen College survey finds one-third of workers afraid of getting fired.

Check out this press release:

As the economy continues to give mixed signals about recovery, one factor is certain – many Washingtonians are still worried about keeping their job.

Despite an uptick in national and statewide hiring trends during the first quarter of 2011, nearly one-third of Washingtonians are concerned about job security, according to data released today in the 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey conducted by Harris/Decima on behalf of Everest College.

When asked about the high unemployment impacting the state and country, 30% of Washington workers said they were concerned about losing their job. Compared with last year, confidence in job security has not budged in 2011, with nearly the same number of Washington workers (29%) concerned about losing their job. One change from last year is that more workers are willing to put in extra hours to keep their job.  Compared with 2010, significantly more people in 2011 have considered working longer hours to avoid being laid off (20% to 14%).

“While recent data indicate that hiring is headed in the right direction, the survey reveals that many people are still anxious about job security,” said Wendy Cullen, vice president of employer development for Everest College. “The last three years have been filled with economic hardships for many in Washington and throughout the country, so it’s natural for workers to be a bit cautious. At Everest, we have found that our career programs are popular because they focus on careers that are in-demand, offer flexibility and have the potential for long-term growth.”
 
Pay Is Top Stressor
The survey found that workplace anxiety levels in Washington continue to be high with nearly two-thirds (62%) of survey respondents claiming they suffer from some form of work-related stress. The top stress factor cited by respondents was pay (27%), followed by fear of losing their job (20%) and their boss (7%). Compared with 2010, significantly less people indicated their boss was causing the most stress at their job (14% to 7%).
 
Income is a differentiating factor when it comes to whether or not respondents are stressed at work. Those with household incomes of $80,000 or higher are more likely not to be stressed at work when compared with those whose household income is less than $50,000 (47% to 27%).
 
If they lost their job, one-third (35%) of respondents said they would consider leaving