UW Business School Ties Up With Game Maker

 
 

The University of Washington is emerging as a pioneer in the emerging world of applying game technology to real life situations.

UW biochemists and computer scientists have been working for some time on ‘Foldit’, a game website now in beta, which allows any interested party to go online and play puzzle-like games while, in the process, helping to solve tough problems in molecular biology. 

 

Now UW’s Foster School of Business has established a strategic partnership with Novel, Inc. a pioneer in developing game-like simulations of what it's like to run a company. Brayden Olson, CEO of Novel Inc., says the partnership will help develop a new approach to teaching business management. 

 

In November, Novel completed Empire and State, a virtual on-line game that allows players to create and manage their own companies.

 

“Our shared goal with Novel is to become the undisputed heavy weights and thought leaders in the new enterprise simulations space,” says Dr. Bruce J. Avolio, executive director of the Foster School of Business Center for Leadership & Strategic thinking.

Avolio says that Novel is further along in this kind of enterprise simulation development and in their vision than any other company they know of. 

 

Mike Marr, Novel’s creative director, says Novel’s massive multiplayer game allows participants to explore, during a compressed time period, complex business situations involved in running a business. The outcomes of the decisions, which might play out over months or even years in real life, can be resolved in just thirty minutes while playing the game.

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

Winner: Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
 
Legacy Award
Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
Auburn › belshaw-adamatic.com
When it’s time to make doughnuts — or loaves of bread, or sheets of rolls — it could well be a Belshaw Adamatic piece of equipment that’s turning out the baked goods. From a 120,000-square-foot plant in Auburn, Belshaw Adamatic produces the ovens, fryers, conveyors and specialty equipment like jelly injectors used by wholesale and retail bakeries.
 
The firm’s two legacy companies — Belshaw started in 1923, Adamatic in 1962 — combined forces in 2007. Italy’s Ali Group North America is the parent.
 
It it takes work to maintain a legacy. A months-long strike in 2013 damaged morale and forced a leadership change. Frank Chandler was named president and CEO of Belshaw Adamatic in September 2013. The company has since strived to mend workplace relationships while also introducing a stream of new products, such as a convection oven, the BX Eco-touch, with energy saving features and steam injection that can be programmed for precise times in baking. The company energetically describes it as “an oven that saves time, reduces errors, makes an awesome product, and is fun to use and depend on every day!”
 
So far, more than 3,000 have been installed in quick-service restaurants, bakeries, cafés and supermarkets in the United States. They are the legacy of Thomas and Walter Belshaw, former builders of marine engines, who began producing patented manual and automated doughnut-making machines in Seattle 90 years ago. They sold thousands worldwide and, today, Belshaw Adamatic is the nation’s largest maker and distributor of doughnut-making equipment.