Tech Impact Awards 2012: Enterprise Computing

FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

Apptio
225 108th Ave. NE, Bellevue
Employees: 200
apptio.com

Since 2007, Apptio has aimed to develop an entirely new category of software, to create what cofounder and CFO Kurt Shintaffer has called the “new IT.” Apptio’s cloud-based Technology Business Management (TBM) solutions help IT departments to track all of their costs, to identify where spending is most effective, and, as CEO Sunny Gupta has explained, to manage the business of technology as well as the technology itself. Apptio’s TBM tools enable managers to assess the cost of IT services, to communicate those costs to corporate leadership, and then to plan, budget and forecast accordingly. Rapid adoption in the financial industry—the company’s services are used by Bank of America, First American Financial and JPMorgan Chase to reduce their IT costs by 10 percent or more—brought the privately held company up to $60 million in bookings for its subscription-based services.

 

Silver Award
ExtraHop Networks
520 Pike St., Seattle
Number of employees: 50
extrahop.com

The toughest problem for ExtraHop’s Application Performance Management (APM) appliance, claims cofounder and CEO Jesse Rothstein, is not in the increasingly complex enterprise systems it monitors to help them run more smoothly. It’s the skeptical look in the eyes of IT managers who have been promised too much in the past. But an installation time of minutes to find and resolve a network’s speed bumps has helped this company, which was founded by two engineers from F5 Networks, to become a major contender in a crowded market quickly.

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