WASHINGTON'S LEADING BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Executive Q & A: Sally Jewell, President and CEO of REI

Since joining REI in 2000, first as COO and later as CEO, Jewell worked with the management team to help turn the consumer co-op from a money-losing business into a vibrant, modern organization with annual revenues that have climbed 250 percent to $1.8 billion.
Leslie D. Helm |   March 2012   |  FROM THE PRINT EDITION

EXERCISE: I always start the day with a workout. When things get busy, I have to get outside. On [a recent] Saturday, with my husband and dog, I climbed Grand Prospect [on Rattlesnake Mountain]. It feels so nice to get a little mud on your feet, a little mist in your face.

YOUTH: My father was a doctor who came over from England in 1959 when I was 3 to take a teaching fellowship at the UW Medical School. My father asked what people did here. They said, “You join REI, you buy a tent and you go camping.” So that’s what we did. Our first trip was to Mount Rainier National Park.

EDUCATION: It was a different era for women when I graduated from high school in 1973. My college [aptitude] test showed high scores in mechanical reasoning and spatial ability, but my recommended professions were nursing and teaching—the same as all my female friends. At UW, I was going to be a dental hygienist, but my roommate said, “You’re smart enough to be a dentist,” so I did pre-dental. When I started dating Warren, now my husband, his engineering homework looked a lot more fun than mine, so I transferred to engineering. Turns out I’m a natural engineer in terms of how my brain is wired.

CAREER: In engineering school, I worked for General Electric for a total of 18 months over a period of three years. It was a good time for engineers. I had 15 offers for jobs coming out of school and ended up working for Mobil. I came back in 1981 to work for Rainier Bank as an oil and gas expert because I loved Seattle. Oil and gas isn’t found in the most pleasant places in the world and, being a woman, there were things I had to put up with that would be considered illegal now, and it just became tiresome. I also wanted to raise my children around grandparents.

REI: When I began as COO, our growth was stagnating. We invested in the internet, but we underinvested in our retail stores, the core of the business. We were good at colder climates but not so good at southern climates. We developed great, innovative products, but I felt we had an enormous opportunity to analyze our member data better to understand what our customers wanted. We’ve since relocated a lot of our stores to more convenient places

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