Commentary: Training our Workforce to Meet Demand

| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

Business and community leaders in Seattle and the Puget Sound region have built a strong foundation for a diverse economy, but developing a vibrant economic base is not enough. Making it sustainable is critical. In order to maintain the regional competitive advantage we have built, we must deepen our local talent pool to support the businesses that create new, innovative jobs.

An increasing number of those jobs require advanced education and training in critical sectors. In fact, Washington needs to add 9,000 graduate degrees per year in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields through 2019 to keep up with employer demand. Seattle, like Boston and San Jose, has a bachelor’s degree attainment rate of nearly 25 percent. However, when comparing graduate degree attainment, Seattle has a rate that is only two-thirds of those cities. It would take more than 100,000 graduate degrees to reach the per capita rate of Boston and San Jose.

Further highlighting our needs in higher education, Seattle ranks comparatively low when it comes to availability of part-time graduate degree programs that can support the schedules and goals of our region’s working professionals. Per capita, Seattle’s supply of part-time graduate degrees is less than half of cities with similarly high attainment levels of bachelor’s degrees.

Seeing this educational gap, Northeastern University, a global, experiential, nonprofit research university based in Boston, is opening a graduate campus in Seattle’s burgeoning South Lake Union neighborhood in January 2013. Northeastern has developed 15 professional graduate degrees tailored to Seattle’s needs in science, engineering, technology, health care, business, education and nonprofit.

Each degree is specifically designed to meet the talent demands of our local innovation economy. A master’s degree in information assurance, for example, is regionally in high demand and also tailored to some of Seattle’s top-tier IT companies and their workforce needs.

We have worked closely with local business leaders for the past year—through more than 250 meetings—to identify the areas of graduate education needed to propel our economy forward and to retain companies known for innovation, companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Starbucks, Seattle BioMed and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

We’re also responding to the need for more accessible graduate degree programs through a hybrid delivery system that combines classes at the South Lake Union campus and online course work. This hybrid approach is designed to suit Seattle’s high-tech culture, combining mobile and wired education with the benefits of face-to-face faculty/peer interaction and teamwork. It provides high-caliber learning with a level of flexibility that allows both busy professionals and stay-at-home parents to get the education they need to take the next step in their careers.

We are inviting companies to get directly involved through partnerships that enable them to help design curricula and customize programs in a way that produces the skilled workforce those firms need to prosper and compete globally.
But purely educational partnerships can only be part of the solution to the challenges faced by our region. We need to develop a strategic approach to broader partnerships involving business and higher education. One possible model for this is the collaboration between the Northeastern Integrated Initiative in Global Health, driven by faculty in Boston, and Seattle BioMed, to develop tailored graduate courses for Seattle and explore joint research initiatives.

Institutions of higher education should be committed to collaborative relationships with area employers who are driving the local economy, thereby creating a truly educated, highly skilled and competitive workforce that aligns talent with industry needs. It’s innovation at work.

Tayloe Washburn
is the graduate campus CEO and dean of Northeastern University–Seattle. He has held leadership roles in education throughout his career. He was recently named Economic Development Champion of the Year by enterpriseSeattle, a regional economic development council.

Creating an Affordable, Inclusive Puget Sound

Creating an Affordable, Inclusive Puget Sound

Making room for our growing population will require more density in urban areas as well as innovation in transportation and office use.
 
 

Seattle has an enviable problem. More and more people are moving to the Puget Sound, so many that, by some estimates, the region’s population could increase by one million residents by 2040. At the same time, Seattle is constrained geographically by water and hills. Our topography is scenic and beautiful, but it also makes it difficult to build new housing.

Further complicating matters, approximately 65 percent of Seattle’s land area is zoned for single-family residences. The hourglass shape of Seattle, at its widest point—between Ballard and Magnuson Park, along 65th Street—is zoned for the lowest density. Meanwhile, the area zoned for the densest development—downtown—is narrowest and where land is most scarce.

Water, land and zoning regulations: these are the facts. If population trends continue, how will people live in our city? As Seattle densifies, how can design provide a more humane environment and housing that all residents can afford? These are some of the questions I’m interested to explore at a panel discussion on October 5, “Seattle 2040: Where Will All the People Live?” at NBBJ’s Seattle office.

 

As an architect, I’m particularly interested in how we might insert greater density, for people of all incomes, into our existing street network including the single-family areas that constitute such a high proportion of Seattle. Mother-in-law apartments, residential units over garages, duplexes and townhouses are just a few options. Done right, we could increase density and affordability without dramatically changing the character of those neighborhoods.

This November a major ballot initiative, Sound Transit 3, could raise billions of dollars to expand light rail. If that happens, it would substantially increase the number of transit-oriented centers in our region, which would lessen the impact of building because we could spread it across more light rail stations.

There are other options. We could look at reusing and densifying public rights-of-way. High-rises like the “no-shadow tower” could mitigate the impacts of tall building on the urban environment. Or driverless cars might create a new transportation system in the next 25 years that fundamentally changes how we get around and where to encourage development.

If you think about the design of office space, 25 years ago, a majority had a private office with limited public amenities; now office space is moving in the other direction, asking people to have less personal space at their desk, but having access to a wider range of shared amenities. I almost think we need a similar approach whereby people move from large single-family houses to smaller homes or apartments. The key to making this work is to have access to more shared, semi-private amenities or nearby public open space.

Some of the issues Seattle faces also challenge many other U.S. cities, but these challenges cannot be solved by design firms single-handedly. A city’s growth affects everyone, young and old, rich and poor, newcomers and long-time residents. We are in this together, and it will require everyone to bring about our shared future. 

David Yuan, AIA, LEED AP, is a partner at global architecture and design firm NBBJ.