2016 Community Impact Awards: The List

Here are this year's winners and links to their profiles.
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Congratulations to the recipients of Seattle Business magazine’s 2016 Community Impact Awards!


Lifetime Achievement
Honoree: Harriet Bullitt


Pro Bono Projects
Gold Award: Kinzer Partners


Sustainability in Business Operations
Gold Award: Theo Chocolate
Silver Award: Sleeping Lady Mountain Resort


Social Entrepreneurship
Gold Award: Savers
Silver Award: Evrnu


Youth Development
Gold Award: Skanska USA


Job Creation and Workforce Development
Gold Award: Bellevue College and Year Up Puget Sound
Silver Award: Millionair Club Charity


Green Products and Services
Gold Award: Optimum Energy
Silver Award: Itek Energy
Silver Award: Rice Fergus Miller


Nonprofit of the Year
Gold Award: FareStart
Silver Award: Wellspring Family Services


Business of the Year, Small Firms 
Gold Award: Sleep Train
Silver Award: Glassybaby


Business of the Year, Large Firms (Eastern Washington)
Gold Award:
Tree Top


Business of the Year, Large Firms (Western Washington)

Gold Award: McKinstry
Silver Award: Columbia Bank

Bright Idea: Labor Saver

Bright Idea: Labor Saver

Forget email. Shyft Technologies makes shift swapping easy.
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New legislation requiring Seattle businesses with 500 or more employees to schedule workers’ hourly shifts two weeks in advance will be a boon to some, but it could complicate the lives of many workers and employers.

Seattle startup Shyft Technologies has created a free smartphone app that simplifies the tangled dance of schedule shuffling by making it easier for employees to swap shifts and for bosses to get shifts covered on short notice. 

The app notifies all staffers automatically when open shifts are posted. Swaps can be approved right on the app. By matching in real time the hours when workers are available with the hours employees need work done, the app creates a more efficient market.

A worker or manager can easily add a bonus as an incentive to fill a shift on short notice, says

Shyft CEO Brett Patrontasch. “It’s a lot easier than email,” he observes. Meanwhile, workers can quickly change their availability status if they want to make more money or free up more time.

The Shyft app uses a combination of geolocation, financial transactions, machine learning and big data analytics to determine availability and pricing. The goal is to create an on-demand workforce that has more control over schedules while providing employers with the fluidity to operate efficiently.

As of late September, more than 12,000 Starbucks baristas, 3,500 Old Navy staffers and 7,500 McDonald’s employees were using Shyft’s app.

Founded in Toronto, the startup moved to Seattle in February to participate in the three-month Techstars mentoring program. This past summer, Shyft obtained $1.5 million in funding from Seattle’s Madrona Venture Group and other investors.